Tour 1, 2013 - The Australian, Adelaide

SelbyFriends Tour 1 colour
Blossom and Grow
Elder Hall, Adelaide, 17 February 2013
Graham Strahle, The Australian

Gabriel Faure's Frenchness to the fore

WHEN Gabriel Faure fled to Germany in 1877, depressed and heartbroken by the decision of his fiancee, Marianne Viardot, to call off their engagement, he steeped himself in the music of Wagner. For solace, he immersed himself in Ring, which he saw in Cologne the following year.
Curiously though, in the work that most openly declares Faure's emotions at the time, his Piano Quartet in C minor, Op 15, it was to Brahms that he turned for inspiration. For a Frenchman, this Teutonic preoccupation would have been decidedly odd except that, at least in chamber music, German composers held a thoroughly dominating position in the late romantic period.
Even so, special care is needed to play Faure's Op 15 so that it sounds rightfully and genuinely French. Within its rich, full and rather dark Brahmsian textures are shafts of light that shine with unmistakable Gallic luminosity.
Selby & Friends -- comprising pianist Kathryn Selby, violinist Elizabeth Layton, German violist Tobias Breider and cellist Clancy Newman -- gave the work all such care.

When Gabriel Faure fled to Germany in 1877, depressed and heartbroken by the decision of his fiancee, Marianne Viardot, to call off their engagement, he steeped himself in the music of Wagner. For solace, he immersed himself in Ring, which he saw in Cologne the following year.

Curiously though, in the work that most openly declares Faure's emotions at the time, his Piano Quartet in C minor, Op 15, it was to Brahms that he turned for inspiration. For a Frenchman, this Teutonic preoccupation would have been decidedly odd except that, at least in chamber music, German composers held a thoroughly dominating position in the late romantic period.

Even so, special care is needed to play Faure's Op 15 so that it sounds rightfully and genuinely French. Within its rich, full and rather dark Brahmsian textures are shafts of light that shine with unmistakable Gallic luminosity.

Selby & Friends -- comprising pianist Kathryn Selby, violinist Elizabeth Layton, German violist Tobias Breider and cellist Clancy Newman -- gave the work all such care. Read the full article in The Australian.

 

Press Reviews